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improvisation guitar

February 19th, 2010 No comments

improvisation guitar
How do I stop my guitar improvisation sounding cheesy?

I've been playing for a while now. I know how to use scales, I understand the concept of playing a solo in the same key as the chords underneath it etc. I know the pentatonic minor pretty well, and the aeolian. Problem is, my improvisation sounds boring and repetitive, and has no feel to it. Theory isn't the problem here, it's my ability to play a good melody using the scales I know. I think it's my ear that needs training but I don't know.

My sister told me once to slow down and let the song breath.

She was exactly right. I was..as they say...wanking off too much.

A good guitar solo should have an opening, a middle and a climax.

If you shoot your whole wad in the first few measures, it's all down hill after that...do not do too much of a good thing.

It sometimes helps to sing your guitar solos...play your solos as though it's not a guitar, but a vocalist singing those notes.

I'm sure you're aware of hammer ons, pull offs, triplets, string bending, string skipping, double stops, small chord shaped arppegios within your solos..etc..etc... All these elements can be drawn from to make your solo stand out and sing.

As someone said earlier..less is more...empty space, or a bent note held longer than usual can create tension where the listener is longing for release.

Also...record yourself playing rhythm guitar then try soloing over your recorded rhythm..you'll know what sounds good and what doesn't.

In closing, and this is a pet peeve of mine...It's impossible to be a good lead guitar player if you are not a good rhythm guitarist. Too many "wankers" neglect this important area. ( You should know a minimum of 5-6 different ways to play each chord..this is invaluable when soloing)

Good luck, and practice till those fingers bleed! Haha

Greg Howe Improvisation Guitar Lesson - www.greghowe.com/lessons

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