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Fender Tweed



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Fender Tweed

The Mesa Boogie Mark Series is a series of guitar amplifiers drafted by Mesa Engineering. It was Mesa's flagship yield until the introduction of the Rectifier series, and the amplifiers are very collectible.

The very first Mark I was drafted in 1969, past Smith, as a jest, corrected Barry Melton's (Country Joe and the Fish) Fender Princeton amplifier. He extracted the yardstick 10 inch speaker and corrected the chassis to fit the enlarged transformers that were was deficient by the 4-10 tweed Fender Bassman, the circuit that he had supplemental into the 12 watt Princeton. Finally, mounting a 12 inch JBL D-120, a republican speaker of the time, Smith had written what would be the first Boogie.

Randall Smith took the "hot-rodded" Princeton into the front store. Coincidentally, Carlos Santana was prevailing and "wailed through that tiny amp until population were blocking the sidewalk." Impressed, Santana articulated Smith, "Man, that tiny amp truly boogies!", consequently delivering the existing call for the amplifier and the company.

"Mark I" is the moniker given to the first Boogies ever drafted, even so they were not summoned "Mark I" until the Mark II came along. They were 100 or 60 watts combo amps with a 12-inch speaker, at the start Altec-Lansing 417-8H Series II. The Mark I had couple channels: one bathe (voiced quite interchangeable to the original Fender) summoned "Input 2," and one "high gain," summoned "Input 1," which effected the overdriven "Boogie lead" utterances adapted bulk notably by Carlos Santana on the "Abraxas" album, and later by The Rolling Stones, with Keith Richards and Ron Wood including the amps survive from 1977 until 1993 and in the studio on classic albums as Some Girls and Tattoo You.

This amp in its original variety is very collectible, but does not have foot switching capabilities--one plugs into one or the other input for the couple tones. Reverb was optional, and not prevailing on more early Boogies. Later, Mark I models were available with reverb and/or graphic EQ.

Early models have "slave out" and "reverb" labeled on the behind with Dymo stick; they do not have any "pull lead" competency on the volume controls. Later models had "Pull Bright" and "Pull Boost" on the volume controls. The front panel controls were Volume 1, Volume 2, Treble, Middle, Bass, and Master. These early models are rightly differing, since more of them were "custom" models, alone fitted out for various buyers.

Mesa/Boogie has stated the original and the reissue have a "looser" lead utterances since the first couple preamp points in time eventuates in the past the tone controls. In the various later Mark II and III models, there is simply one gain point in time in the past the tone controls. This indication chain is an subject of numerous contest among Boogie owners.

The Mark II introduced channel foot switching, and wasn't referred to as the "Mark IIA" until the Mark IIB was issued. It was also available as a chief, which could be hooked higher to a diagram of dissimilar speaker combinations, even so a 1x12 spy voice recorder add secret voice recorder cabinet was typical. However, the reverb circuit is considered noisy and the foot switching drafted a popping utterances past used; both of these attributes were later transformed on the Mark IIC. The preamp gain on the Mark IIs eventuates later the tone controls and so, according to Mesa/Boogie, the IIA has a "tighter, more fled accent on sound" than the Mark I.

The IIA and IIB, and numerous late-model Mark I amps, adapted a silicon implement summoned "fetron" in place of one of the 12AX7 preamp tubes, and included a switch for configuring the amp for either fetron or 12AX7 operation. The intent for including a fetron was to appraise numerous of the difficulties joined with microphonic 12AX7 tubes in a high-gain situation; its exercise was later discontinued.

The Mark III was launched by Mesa/Boogie in 1985. It introduced a third channel, a "crunch" rhythm utterances right in between the rhythm and lead channels. This amp has a many foot switch system: one foot switch replacements between the existing rhythm mode and the lead mode, and the other decides either the bathe rhythm mode or the crunch rhythm mode. The couple rhythm modes detail all of their controls, where the lead mode simply allocations the rhythm modes' tone heap, featuring independent gain and master volume controls. The Mark III suspended demonstration in 1989.

Fender Tweed Amps

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